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British Channel 4 engaged the Team Delta Cadre to recreate the Guantanamo Bay interrogation experience.  At the production company’s request, along with Team Delta’s normal approach to interrogation,  the cadre also reenacted several specific events reported to have occurred at Guantanamo.  In most cases these reenacted events were counter productive to the interrogation plan developed by Team Delta – a plan that had learned 80% of the requested intelligence within the first few hours of capture.

Total deprivation of sleep, food and water, exposure to extreme heat and cold, up to 20 minutes in stress positions, up to 2 hours listening to white noise… plus any other interrogation technique deemed acceptable by the interrogation team’ By any standards the waiver I signed for “Guantanamo Guidebook” was special, and two weeks later when I was lying naked, shaved, shackled in a ball on the floor, alone with a hood over my head, listening to white noise with a cold fan at my back, I realized just how superficial the term ‘informed consent’ can be. [Read more on this article.]

Video (Playlist): http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=90FAA7612FACC91C (Source #1)

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-1403370850111668271# (Source #2)

The Falling Man refers to a photograph taken by Associated Press photographer Richard Drew, depicting a man falling from the North Tower of the World Trade Center at 9:41:15 a.m. during the September 11 attacks in New York City.

The subject of the image – whose identity remains uncertain, although attempts have been made to identify him – was one of the people trapped on the upper floors of the skyscraper who apparently chose to jump rather than die from the fire and smoke.

As many as 200 people jumped to their deaths that day; there was no time to recover or identify those who were forced to jump prior to the collapse of the towers.

Officially, all deaths in the attacks except those of the hijackers were ruled to be homicides (as opposed to suicides), and the New York City medical examiner’s office stated that it does not classify the people who fell to their deaths on September 11 as “jumpers”: “A ‘jumper’ is somebody who goes to the office in the morning knowing that they will commit suicide… These people were forced out by the smoke and flames or blown out.”

9/11: The Falling Man is a 2006 documentary film about the picture and the story behind it. It was made by American filmmaker Henry Singer and filmed by Richard Numeroff, a New York-based director of photography. The film is loosely based on Junod’s Esquire story. It also drew its material from photographer Lyle Owerko’s pictures of falling people.

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BXnA9FjvLSU

In 2007, Italian police make an astonishing discovery during a raid on a Mafia boss’ villa: a list of the Mafia’s most sacred laws.

It’s an incredible find: a code of conduct for the Mob. Now, for the first time, former Mobsters speak out about the rules that govern their criminal world; and reveal what happened when gangland began to question the so-called Ten Commandments of the Mafia.

The document makes clear that people with police or informers in their family cannot become members of the Mob. And although mobsters’ wives must be respected, they should not expect much support during childbirth: the rules state that “always being available for Cosa Nostra is a duty – even if your wife’s about to give birth”.

The Decalogue was discovered along with a large number of other coded documents in a house near Palermo where Mr Lo Piccolo was apprehended after spending more than two decades on the run from police. Investigators say that the documents – including the Ten Commandments – will give them an insight into how the Mafia operates.

The papers also reveal details of companies with Mafia connections and information about the hierarchy within the organization.

Video (Playlist): http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=9A4465CA7B46B04C

In January, February and March of 2010 the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) and Cinema Politica are teaming up to organize a tour of the documentary THE COCA-COLA CASE, a film about the legal case against Coca-Cola and their operations in Colombia.

Two lawyers and labor rights’ activists, Daniel Kovalik of the United Steel Workers of America and Terry Collingsworth of the International Rights Advocates, and their partner Ray Rogers of Corporate Campaign firmly believe that US multinational corporations should be held accountable for the shabby practices of their business associates throughout the world. To lead their battle, they resort to a law dating back to the origin of the American Constitution – The Alien Tort Claims Act – which allows foreigners to file suit in the U.S. against Americans who violate international laws. The film tells the story of their fight against one of America’s stellar icons: the Coca-Cola company.

Video (Playlist): http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=E5DE323198499DC0