Several thousand years have passed since their construction, and still, the enigma of the pyramids is not fully understood.

The structures have survived all these years of natural weathering and damage inflicted by modern mankind.

Through the magic of computer simulation, the viewer can experience the pyramids as they must have appeared to the ancient Egyptians who built them.

Ultimate Guide: Pyramids also provides information on how the pyramids might have been constructed.

Documentary that goes inside the framework of pyramids to show how these structures have changed over time, starting as flat-roofed houses and evolving into temples and grave sites.

The program reconstructs how these fabled pyramids and their cities must have looked at the peak of their civilizations.

Video (Playlist): http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=BAC872510149DEBC

Advertisements

Nothing is more fascinating to us than, well, us. Where did we come from? What makes us human? NOVA’s groundbreaking investigation explores how new discoveries are transforming views of our earliest ancestors.

Featuring interviews with world-renowned scientists, footage shot in the trenches as fossils were unearthed, and stunning computer-generated animation, Becoming Human brings early hominids to life, examining how they lived and how we became the creative and adaptable modern humans of today.

In the first episode, NOVA encounters Selam, the amazingly complete remains of a 3 million year-old child, packed with clues to why we split from the apes, came down from the trees, and started walking upright.

In gripping forensic detail, the second episode investigates the riddle of Turkana Boy -a tantalizing fossil of Homo erectus, the first ancestor to leave Africa and colonize the globe. What led to this first great African exodus?

In the final episode, Becoming Human explores the origins of us -where modern humans and our capacities for art, invention, and survival came from, and what happened when we encountered the mysterious Neanderthals.

Crucial new evidence comes from the recent decoding of the Neanderthal genome. Did modern humans interbreed with Neanderthals? Exterminate them?

Becoming Human examines why we survived while our other ancestral cousins-including Indonesia’s bizarre 3 foot-high Hobbit -died out. And NOVA poses the intriguing question: Are we still evolving today?

Video (Playlist): http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=2CEE805C23C756FC

The Business of Being Born is a 2008 documentary film that explores the contemporary experience of childbirth in the United States.

Produced by Ricki Lake, it compares various childbirth methods, including midwives, natural births, epidurals, and Cesarean sections.

The film criticizes the American health care system with its emphasis on drugs and costly interventions and its view of childbirth as a medical emergency rather than a natural occurrence.

The film documents actual home births and water births. They follow a midwife, Cara, in New York as she takes care of and attends several births.

They then give the audience several shocking statistics about our current birthing techniques and challenges today’s doctors.

For example, the United States has the second worst newborn death rate in the developed world. Many experts are interviewed and they cite a multitude of reasons for this dismal statistic such as the overuse of medical procedures in the interest of saving time.

Video (Playlist): http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=4ED3CB06302B65F4

The Falling Man refers to a photograph taken by Associated Press photographer Richard Drew, depicting a man falling from the North Tower of the World Trade Center at 9:41:15 a.m. during the September 11 attacks in New York City.

The subject of the image – whose identity remains uncertain, although attempts have been made to identify him – was one of the people trapped on the upper floors of the skyscraper who apparently chose to jump rather than die from the fire and smoke.

As many as 200 people jumped to their deaths that day; there was no time to recover or identify those who were forced to jump prior to the collapse of the towers.

Officially, all deaths in the attacks except those of the hijackers were ruled to be homicides (as opposed to suicides), and the New York City medical examiner’s office stated that it does not classify the people who fell to their deaths on September 11 as “jumpers”: “A ‘jumper’ is somebody who goes to the office in the morning knowing that they will commit suicide… These people were forced out by the smoke and flames or blown out.”

9/11: The Falling Man is a 2006 documentary film about the picture and the story behind it. It was made by American filmmaker Henry Singer and filmed by Richard Numeroff, a New York-based director of photography. The film is loosely based on Junod’s Esquire story. It also drew its material from photographer Lyle Owerko’s pictures of falling people.

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BXnA9FjvLSU

In 2007, Italian police make an astonishing discovery during a raid on a Mafia boss’ villa: a list of the Mafia’s most sacred laws.

It’s an incredible find: a code of conduct for the Mob. Now, for the first time, former Mobsters speak out about the rules that govern their criminal world; and reveal what happened when gangland began to question the so-called Ten Commandments of the Mafia.

The document makes clear that people with police or informers in their family cannot become members of the Mob. And although mobsters’ wives must be respected, they should not expect much support during childbirth: the rules state that “always being available for Cosa Nostra is a duty – even if your wife’s about to give birth”.

The Decalogue was discovered along with a large number of other coded documents in a house near Palermo where Mr Lo Piccolo was apprehended after spending more than two decades on the run from police. Investigators say that the documents – including the Ten Commandments – will give them an insight into how the Mafia operates.

The papers also reveal details of companies with Mafia connections and information about the hierarchy within the organization.

Video (Playlist): http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=9A4465CA7B46B04C

In January, February and March of 2010 the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) and Cinema Politica are teaming up to organize a tour of the documentary THE COCA-COLA CASE, a film about the legal case against Coca-Cola and their operations in Colombia.

Two lawyers and labor rights’ activists, Daniel Kovalik of the United Steel Workers of America and Terry Collingsworth of the International Rights Advocates, and their partner Ray Rogers of Corporate Campaign firmly believe that US multinational corporations should be held accountable for the shabby practices of their business associates throughout the world. To lead their battle, they resort to a law dating back to the origin of the American Constitution – The Alien Tort Claims Act – which allows foreigners to file suit in the U.S. against Americans who violate international laws. The film tells the story of their fight against one of America’s stellar icons: the Coca-Cola company.

Video (Playlist): http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=E5DE323198499DC0

Congratulations: You are an ape. A “great ape,” technically. Alongside us in this brainy family of animals are four other living species: chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans, and bonobos (formerly called “pygmy chimpanzees”). The biological gap between us and our great ape cousins is small. At last count, only 1.23 percent of our genes differ from those of chimpanzees. But mentally, the gap between us and them is a Grand Canyon.

On an average day in the life of the human species, we file thousands of patents, post tens of thousands of Internet videos, and think countless thoughts that have never been thought before. On a good day, chimpanzees are lucky to exploit rudimentary tried-and-true techniques, such as using stone tools to crack nuts.

Not only do we innovate more than the other great apes, we are vastly better at sharing ideas with one another. The majority of recent behavioral studies focus on information-transmission rather than invention. All of the great apes can learn new tricks by imitating a human or another ape. But only humans go one step further and routinely teacheach other. Teaching may be the signature skill of our species, and researchers are now zeroing in on three particular mental talents that make it possible.

Our DNA is less than 2 percent different from that of chimpanzees, so what is that makes humans so different from the great apes? Find out what our ape cousins can do — and what they can’t.

Video (Playlist): http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=C68538044D52A06C